forbidden archeology

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forbidden archeology

Post by dill786 »

Buried Easter Island Moai statue devoid of weathering shows detailed carvings.
xx4.jpg

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Post by dill786 »

I wonder what the etchings are depicting,

Mohenjo-Daro ( the mound of the dead) whose writings to this day have never been deciphered is extremely similar to the easter island iconography, strange as easter island is in the pacific ocean and Mohenjo-Daro is in Sindh Pakistan..



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Post by bentech »

^^^one hell of a documentary...
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Post by dill786 »

ive been to mohenjodaro ben

back in 2004, it was so hot i think it was around 32C at the time, and people were reversing their trucks right near the mound and stealing the adobe bricks to use in constructing their own houses, there was doing this for a whole week before the cops turned up and stopped them doing, they mus have stolen tonnes and tonnes of bricks,,

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Post by ben ttech »

Fur is a controversial fashion statement these days. But stepping out in a wildcat cape or jackal wrap was de rigueur for Pleistocene humans, according to the recent discovery of a 120,000-year-old leather and fur production site that contains some of the oldest archaeological evidence for human clothing.

Homo sapiens at the site first made and wore clothes around the onset of an Ice Age which may suggest that, even in relatively mild Morocco, clothes were adopted as a way to keep warm. But the invention of animal-based apparel also corresponds with the appearance of personal adornments, like shell beads, which hints that prehistoric clothing, like today’s styles, could have been about style as well as functionality.



https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science- ... 180978689/
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Post by rSin »

Human Footprints in North America Dated to 23,000 Years Ago

TUCSON, ARIZONA—According to a statement released by the University of Arizona, human footprints found in New Mexico’s White Sands National Park have been dated to 23,000 years ago. Jeff Pigati and Kathleen Springer of the U.S. Geological Survey radiocarbon dated seeds found above and below multiple layers of footprints left behind in stream beds at White Sands National Park over a 2,000-year period. The size of the footprints suggest they were made mainly by playing teenagers and younger children, but an occasional adult did visit the stream, said Matthew Bennett of Bournemouth University. It had been previously thought that migrants waited to enter North America until the melting of the ice sheets opened up overland migration routes, but these new dates for the site’s oldest tracks show that people had arrived in North America during the Last Glacial Maximum. The prints of mammoths, giant sloths, and other extinct animals were also found, indicating that they shared the landscape with humans.


https://news.arizona.edu/story/earliest ... d-americas
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Post by Intrinsic »

synchronicity, I just finished reading about the White Sands footprints over here

https://phys.org/news/2021-09-earliest- ... ricas.html

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Post by rSin »

they came in boats avery long time ago
spent months skirting the edge of the icesheets...


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Post by ben ttech »

Ancient DNA from a teen girl reveals previously unknown group of humans

The bones of a teenage hunter-gatherer who died more than 7,000 years ago on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi tell the story of a previously unknown group of humans.

This distinct human lineage has never been found anywhere else in the world, according to new research.
The study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

"We have discovered the first ancient human DNA in the island region between Asia and Australia, known as 'Wallacea', providing new insight into the genetic diversity and population history of early modern humans in this little understood part of the world," said study coauthor Adam Brumm, a professor of archaeology at Griffith University's Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution, via email.


https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/25/world/wa ... index.html
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Post by ben ttech »

A collection of 19 bone fish hooks and six grooved pebbles suggests that prehistoric anglers had a detailed knowledge of fish behavior and diet as early as 13,000 years ago and likely used some of the same fishing techniques used today.

The hooks and pebbles — believed to have been used as sinkers — were found at the archaeological site called the Jordan River Dureijat, located on the banks of the Jordan River in northern Israel and dates back to the Epipaleolithic period, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. It’s some of the earliest evidence of complex fishing technology.

Fish remains have been found at sites inhabited by human ancestors dating back to nearly 2 million years. But studying what technology early humans used to acquire fish is difficult because fishing gear was typically made from perishable materials like wood and plant fibers, and they’re only preserved in unusual conditions.

The waterlogged Jordan River Dureijat site was discovered in 1999 as a result of a drainage operation. But back in the Levantine Epipaleolithic periods, it was a short-term encampment that was intermittently occupied over a span of about 10,000 years, according to an earlier study published in the PaleoAnthropology journal. It was never used for habitation, but rather it was a place that people repeatedly visited to fish and hunt and take advantage of other natural resources.


https://www.courthousenews.com/prehisto ... echniques/
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