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A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2020 9:25 am
by Munchy

your speculation must've been based on something, right?

and I'm sure we would believe it if you said yes... unless we've gotten the wrong impression, and maybe it just means that you're depressed, then I'd want to believe. but otherwise unless maybe you think we're too dumb to notice the obvious clue, perhaps you chose your username in the interest of openness, and then why bother to deny it? so it seemed fair to ask out of curiosity. but I doubt if an admission would really change much here either... aside from leading to the next logical question of your motivation, but even that probably wouldn't be too surprising or worrisome.

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2020 11:36 am
by AGD
AlwaysBlue wrote:
AGD wrote:The problem with these Bitcoins is, that it will be very hard to cash out or even buying goods with it. These coins are tainted for a very long time. For example in Germany transactions above 10000€ (about 1 BTC at the present time) will be checked by banks for money laundering. So most likely the holder of the money will have to wait until the SR indictment is statute barred. Even after that time people will know where the money came from. Selling the Bitcoins off the record will be quite difficult. Who will buy coins, that will raise attention from LE and the risk of being confiscated? I wouldn't.


Go to this site: http://www.BustaBit.com
Take a look at the leaderboard and look at the volumes of BTC being churned on this site


As soon as only one Satoshi of one of those wallets are deposited at this gambling site LE is going after Ryan and Daniel or whoever is in charge of the site now :emp:

smokebreaks wrote:In the US it is supposed to be over $10k triggers a SAR (suspicious activity report) but in actuality it's any convertible over $3,000. You buy $3k in money orders, it gets reported. You convert an asset to cash valued over $3k and someone is going to want to see an ID. Guaranteed that ID is registered as it's an entity sale. Hell, most banks now frown on any large cash deposits. Mine requires an ID everytime they hire a new teller, and I'm there almost every damn day.

One can only imagine the bells and whistles when a SWIFT transaction comes through for nearly a billion dollars. :loony:

So meanwhile as these coins sit, it keeps the value artificially inflated due to scarcity?

Isn't that kind of doing the exact opposite of the original intent?

If it is tied to the Silk Road BTC, and having it priced over $10,000 USD per, it kinda defeats the purpose of it being anonymous no?


Bitcoin has never been anonymous and it wasn't designed to be. At best it is pseudonymous, which means that you can't track coins to an individual unless you reveal your identity. This mostly happens when you cash out or you buy goods. Sure, many of the SR sellers went under the radar because LE didn't understand the concept of Bitcoin and what type of problems it actually solves, but Bitcoin tracking services became a lot better now and the higher the number the more motivation (and budget) is there to actually find the owner. As you can see, the Bitcoin scene is always monitoring 'famous' wallets and every move will be a social media topic.

About the scarcity thing. Those Bitcoins will definitely not be called dead or burnt, because they actually aren't. If one day LE gets their hands on it, they will be sold just like the ones they were able to confiscate from Ross in 2013.

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2020 11:55 am
by rSin
Hard to imagine that ALL inteligence agencies wernt bitcoin mining from the get go...

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:19 pm
by smokebreaks
Munchy wrote:your speculation must've been based on something, right?

and I'm sure we would believe it if you said yes... unless we've gotten the wrong impression, and maybe it just means that you're depressed, then I'd want to believe. but otherwise unless maybe you think we're too dumb to notice the obvious clue, perhaps you chose your username in the interest of openness, and then why bother to deny it? so it seemed fair to ask out of curiosity. but I doubt if an admission would really change much here either... aside from leading to the next logical question of your motivation, but even that probably wouldn't be too surprising or worrisome.



Dude could maybe just be a dyed in the wool AlwaysBlue democrat?!. :laugh:

I honestly don't think it would be LEO to be honest but what if it is? So be it.

We don't have any problem with the legalities of this site.

We don't allow sales or advertising of any kind.

Specifically to this subject, I've never had a Silk Road account and never held any bitcoins or have any interest in it. I'm sure the US Government is keenly aware from scrutiny I'm certain we've already been subject to thanks to this little episode that we're not a money making commercial venture, and we're more of an opinionated hobbyist consortium.

Although our user base stretches across the globe and we've lost a lot of good people along the way, the people who post here are people in areas of the US where Marijuana is legal, that use this forum.

And the site itself is hosted in a country where it's legal as well, thanks to the The Canadian federal government announcing recreational use of cannabis would no longer violate the law in 2018.

In Canada, it's like home brewing.

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:44 pm
by smokebreaks
And it looks like they are finally getting the ball rolling on a sentencing date tentatively for Mongoose.


September 17, 2020

Honorable William H. Pauley
United States District Court
Southern District of New York
500 Pearl Street
New York, NY 10017
Re: United States v. Roger Thomas Clark
15-cr-866 (WHP)

Dear Judge Pauley:

I write to ask the Court to set a sentencing date for Mr. Clark. As the Court knows, I have
requested that Mr. Clark's sentencing be delayed in light of the limitations the COVID-19
pandemic has imposed on my ability to communicate effectively with Mr. Clark and his ability to
participate fully in preparing a sentencing submission. Attorney-client visits have now resumed
at the MDC. Equally important, Mr. Clark's unit, which was on total lock down following an
incidents of violence at the facility is now back on "modified lockdown," which permits Mr. Clark
to be out of his cell and thereby access legal-research materials for three hours a day. After
consulting with the government I propose the following schedule: Mr. Clark's sentencing
submission would be due on November 6, 2020.
The government would respond by November
16. Any defense reply would be filed on or before November 20, 2020. Sentencing would follow
at the Court's convenience.

I believe this amount of time is appropriate for several reasons. First, the MDC has been
on modified lockdown since March 2020. This has limited inmates' time out of their cells to threehours
a day. Mr. Clark advised me that during that window inmates have to line up for and eat
their meals, do laundry, take showers (there is always a line), and communicate with family. The
remaining time is minimal. Following an incident at the facility on June 28, 2020, Mr. Clark's unit
was locked down and searched for contraband by a special Bureau of Prisons squad. The unit has
been on an off lockdown since. During the June 28 search, the bulk of Mr. Clark's legal materials,
including documents he intends to use in helping me preparing his sentencing submission, was
thrown away. I have replaced that material in the interim, but during the search, Mr. Clark's
Case 1:15-cr-00866-WHP Document 61 Filed 09/17/20 Page 2 of 2
reading glasses were crushed. He was not given a medical appointment, which resulted in his
being issued a new pair of glasses, until August 7.

Additionally, I will need time to meet with Mr. Clark, review what he has prepared and
incorporate it into my own sentencing submission. This will be time-consuming.
For all of the reasons stated above, I ask that the Court adopt the schedule the parties
propose.

Respectfully submitted,
____ __,s/ _____ _
Stephanie Carvlin
cc: AUSA Michael Neff
AUSA Vladislav Vainsberg {via ECF)

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 4:23 am
by Oldjoints
smokebreaks wrote:I honestly don't think it would be LEO to be honest but what if it is? So be it.


Wouldn’t matter to me, I’m legal and always assumed LE was watching anyway. I have known many cops and just like any profession there is good and bad....

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 1:32 am
by Prawn Connery
Munchy wrote:your speculation must've been based on something, right?

and I'm sure we would believe it if you said yes... unless we've gotten the wrong impression, and maybe it just means that you're depressed, then I'd want to believe. but otherwise unless maybe you think we're too dumb to notice the obvious clue, perhaps you chose your username in the interest of openness, and then why bother to deny it? so it seemed fair to ask out of curiosity. but I doubt if an admission would really change much here either... aside from leading to the next logical question of your motivation, but even that probably wouldn't be too surprising or worrisome.

Hey mate, have a look at the guy's posting history – I don't think he's LEO. Even if he was, well there's nothing stopping anyone from accessing a public site so we all have to assume that anyone is reading us at any time. Which is why I mostly stayed out of this thread and why I was a bit annoyed at people posting things on here initially that I thought could make the Feds' job a bit easier. Especially when journos/writers started asking questions and some people had no qualms about answering them on a public forum.

It may all be moot now, but in the begining – especially when it appeared PoM was going to fight the charges – the last thing any of us should have been doing is blabbing about what we knew. Of course, none of this is aimed at you. I'm just venting.

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:54 am
by Munchy
sorry I asked. seems there is some inside info about how POM just shaved 10 years off his sentence, but I guess we're supposed to ignore that to be all PC here now. I must've missed the memo when this site changed into a bunch of pussies, afraid to ask the obvious for fear of offending someone. but it seems that you keep trying to argue me down when we're already in agreement.. I tried to make clear enough to begin with what you guys keep telling me now as if I didn't already say basically the same thing: "so it seemed fair to ask out of curiosity. but I doubt if an admission would really change much here either... aside from leading to the next logical question of your motivation, but even that probably wouldn't be too surprising or worrisome."

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 6:34 am
by Prawn Connery
I'm not sure if that's directed at me, but if it is I think you've taken what I wrote the wrong way. Even after I said my post wasn't directed at you :wink:

In simple bullet points:

* I don't think AlwaysBlue is a cop – unless he was a bent cop – because he said he spent time inside

* Whether one member here is a cop or not should make no difference to the way we post – because anyone can read what we write

* I have no idea if PoM shaved 10 years off his sentence or not. He hasn't even been sentenced yet

* What little I know about PoM will never be revealed on an open forum because I'm not in the habit of making life easier for cops, journalists or anyone else who wishes to exploit his situation. Not that it would make much difference now

* Munchy needs to get laid

:toker1:

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 12:52 pm
by Intrinsic



I did like the idea of her being a democratic fanatic tho.

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2020 3:07 pm
by AlwaysBlue
Well well, looks like PoM getting some housekeeping done before his sentencing hearing in December. Smart move, will probably buy him a few years. Tainted coins would be worthless to anyone except the gvt, looks like those encrypted flash drives actually held something valuable after all

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-54810976

Bitcoin: $1bn address with Silk Road links 'being transferred'

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2020 8:26 pm
by rSin
Holy shit! Thats got to be some record! Heh!!!

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2020 9:42 pm
by Jesús Malverde
I was just going to post up another version of the same story. Nearly a billion USD and no real way to ever spend it anonymously. Must be quite frustrating for whoever owns the wallet. Who ever thought that holding illegal profits in Bitcoin made even a little sense? Small timers, OK maybe, but a billion? I guess you could claim you cracked the passcode and just stole the money :twisted: Either way, unless it is some arm of the USG holding the wallet, the owner is fucked six ways :tup:

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2020 10:47 pm
by Blackie
Prawn Connery wrote:I just hope those bastards are rolling in Bitcoin. A few years in the clink for a multi-million payout isn't a bad little earner.


Silk Road bitcoins worth $1bn change hands after seven years
Funds have lain dormant since darknet site founder Ross Ulbricht was jailed in 2013

The wallet in question contains almost 70,000 bitcoins. Photograph: Dado Ruvić/Reuters
Alex Hern Technology editor
@alexhern
Wed 4 Nov 2020 13.44 GMT
Last modified on Wed 4 Nov 2020 14.10 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/ ... even-years

A billion dollars worth of bitcoins linked to the shuttered darknet market Silk Road has changed hands for the first time in seven years, prompting renewed speculation about the fate of the illicit fortune.

Almost 70,000 bitcoins stored in the account which, like all bitcoin wallets, is visible to the public, had lain untouched since April 2013. The website was shut down by an FBI raid six months after they were deposited, and they have not moved since.

Late on Tuesday night, however, the full amount less a $12 (£9) transaction fee was transferred to a new bitcoin address, records show.

“Through blockchain analysis we can determine that these funds likely originated from the Silk Road,” said Tom Robinson, chief scientist at the cryptocurrency analysts Elliptic. “They left the Silk Road’s wallet back on 6 May 2012 when they were worth around $350,000 and then remained dormant for nearly a year, before being moved … in April 2013.”

From there, the funds have lain dormant. After the marketplace was shut down in late 2013, its founder and boss, 36-year-old San Franciscan Ross Ulbricht, was sentenced to a double life sentence plus 40 years without possibility of parole. The FBI managed to seize 174,000 bitcoins, then worth about $100m, but an estimated 450,000 earned by the marketplace remain unaccounted for.

Robinson says it is unclear who moved the money. “The movement of these bitcoins today, now worth around $955m, may represent Ulbricht or a Silk Road vendor moving their funds,” he said. “However, it seems unlikely that Ulbricht would be able to conduct a bitcoin transaction from prison.”

One possibility is that an individual or group has managed to “crack” the wallet, effectively guessing its password and stealing the funds. A file that some claimed was an encrypted bitcoin wallet containing the keys to the funds has been circulated in cryptocurrency communities for the past year, and – if it is what it was claimed to be – then a combination of brute computing power and good luck could have successfully decrypted the wallet.

Simply guessing the private key of a bitcoin wallet is functionally impossible. Using the world’s fastest supercomputer to try every combination would take as many times more than the age of the universe as there have been seconds since the Big Bang.

But if the actual wallet file leaks, then the task is much simpler because it only involves guessing the password that protects the private key. “It is likely that it was ‘brute-forced’, ie all possible passwords were tried. This is computationally feasible if the password is short enough,” Robinson said. “Note that you can’t do this with any old bitcoin address. What is unusual here is that an encrypted wallet file for this address has apparently become available [if it’s real].

“Either way, the funds are now on the move, and whoever now controls the bitcoins may want to cash them out,” Robinson said. As for whether it was an insider or a hacker, his guess it’s as likely either way. “I’d say I’m 50/50 right now, perhaps leaning towards a Silk Roader. They were clearly biding their time and waiting for a busy news day in order to do this without it getting too much attention.”

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2020 10:56 pm
by Blackie
FinCEN proposes lower threshold for transaction data-gathering under FATF's 'travel rule' including those made with crypto

Newly proposed rule changes from the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) and the U.S. Federal Reserve would, if approved, drop the transaction reporting threshold under the international "travel rule," including those made with cryptocurrencies and digital assets.

As noted in the proposed rule change document, the amendments "would reduce this threshold from $3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States."

"FinCEN is likewise proposing to reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold in the rule requiring financial institutions to transmit to other financial institutions in the payment chain information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States." FinCEN clarified that the domestic threshold "remains unchanged at $3,000."

As well, the document includes a clarification to the rules to ensure that they are clearly applied to transactions involving cryptocurrencies and digital assets.

The document notes:

"The Agencies are also proposing to clarify the meaning of “money” as used in these same rules to ensure that the rules apply to domestic and cross-border transactions involving convertible virtual currency This document is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on 10/27/2020 and available online at federalregister.gov/d/2020-23756, and on govinfo.gov (“CVC”), which is a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but lacks legal tender status. The Agencies further propose to clarify that these rules apply to domestic and cross-border transactions involving digital assets that have legal tender status."

As previously reported, the "travel rule" applies to financial institutions that must transmit information between one another about those behind financial transactions above a certain size. Last summer, the Financial Action Task Force included in its 2019 guidance that cryptocurrency exchanges must adhere to the travel rule — a development that has kicked off a multi-faceted response to find ways to comply with the rule.

Just this week, a white paper from a group of U.S. crypto businesses proposed a peer-to-peer messaging system through which they could share information about transactors.

Some awesome (clearnet link) PDFs to read: https://www.gdf.io/wp-content/uploads/2 ... ion-V1.pdf

https://public-inspection.federalregist ... -23756.pdf

A damsel in distress. Plural of Mongoose Update.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:45 am
by Jesús Malverde
I've got a place in the EU, and I have to pay taxes there as a result and moving any significant sums of money between US and EU bank accounts is already under a microscope. You would probably be surprised at all the legal hoops one is required as a US citizen to open a bank account in the EU. I in the end had to hire a local EU lawyer to manage it. I expect, since the bureaucratic barriers are mostly on the US end, that you are looking at similar difficulties moving money from any other country in or out of the US.